Welcome to the Canadian Orange Historical Site

Orangeism, which was introduced into England, Scotland, and Australia by soldiers serving in the British army, was to enter Canada by the same route. The earliest record of an Orange Lodge in the British North American colonies was in New Brunswick in 1783 a full twelve years before the official birth of the Orange Lodge system as we now know it. This lodge met under a charter issued in 1694 in London, England, the name on the charter being ‘Colonial Patent No. 6’, and it was issued from Guild Hall, London and signed by Robert Ware. It was sealed with the Hestercomb Arms and certified under seal by the Goldsmiths of Lombard Street. It was brought to Parrtown [Saint John] from the United States by Lieutenant Andrew Hunter Stockton and the lodge met in Saint John until 1815 under the authority of this warrant which granted the bearer the right to hold an Orange Lodge anywhere in British America. By the early 1800’s Orange Lodges had been established in Halifax, Montreal, and Quebec City. During the War of 1812 British regiments were sent to the British North American colonies to defend them against attack from the United States and it was from these soldiers that Orangeism took its real hold in Canada. For two hundred years Orange Lodges have been a part of Canadian life, and it is their history and contribution to Canadian society that this site will attempt to document.

Canadian Orange Lodges are invited to submit a history of their lodge and it will be included on this site. All pictures and other submissions will be given a credit line where the item is used. Please help us to preserve Canada’s rich Orange history.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Can anyone help out??

In 1890 an Orange Lodge was formed in Dauphin, Manitoba. The first lodge master was P.J. Beauchamp. Other elected officers were Harry Hughes, George Barker, Samuel Perry, James McDowell, William Sutherland, E. F. McPherson, William Boyd, Angus McDonald, and William Dunfield. Four new members were initiated at this meeting: Joseph Potts, John F. Boyd, Chris Felker and G. W. J. Barker (father of Victoria Cross winner and 1st World War pilot Billy Barker). Barker came from strong Orange families on both his father’s and mother’s side. His mother was an Alguire and Barker was close to the family as his best friends were his cousins the Alguires and several of them were Orange Lodge members. Does anyone know of anything that would shed some light on Barker and the Orange Lodge?

Taken from “Dauphin Valley Spans the Years” dated July, 1970 and published by the Dauphin Historical Society.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment